Weather Eye: This week brings dose of typically rainy fall weather

By Patrick Timm, Columbian weather columnist

Published:

 
photoPatrick Timm

Nothing too surprising this week weather-wise, with lots of clouds and showers, some dry periods and highs mostly in the 50s forecast. No big storms looming on the horizon.

Some decent rainfall was noted Sunday and Monday -- generally around an inch, but up to 3 inches in the foothills. The freezing level rose enough on Monday that just plain rain was falling at pass levels around Mount Hood. Cold air trapped in eastern Washington brought another round of snowfall for the Spokane area.

Just a reminder that the Oregon Chapter of the American Meteorological Society will host the 20th annual Winter Weather Forecast Conference on Saturday at 10 a.m. at OMSI in Portland. The public is invited.

I mentioned the other day that it appears we will be in for another roller-coaster ride regarding the weather, so enjoy the rather level course this week before we take another trip up and down in the near future.

It is hard to believe that next week is Thanksgiving already. The weather over the past weekend sure felt like winter, with highs only in the 40s, even with some sunshine.

Since there isn't much noteworthy weather heading our wa,y this is what I wrote exactly one year ago today: "Some wild weather came through the Pacific Northwest on Friday afternoon with a brief shot of heavy rain and some strong gusty winds between 30-40 mph blowing leaves everywhere. Another weather front moved through late Saturday and showers will continue Sunday. The rest of the week continues to trend toward colder and wetter weather. Snow levels will tumble by the end of the week, with good mountain snows and maybe, just maybe, some local residents in the higher elevations around Clark County will see some snowflakes."

No snowflakes in our forecast this week, but as always stay tuned!

Patrick Timm is a local weather specialist. His column appears Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. Reach him at Weather Systems.