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Aug. 16, 2022

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Battle Ground loses city manager to Moses Lake

Williams worked for city for 8 years, 5 in that role

By , Columbian Business Reporter
Published:

Cue the exit music.

Battle Ground City Manager John Williams has accepted a job leading the city government of Moses Lake, in Central Washington.

“John has brought a great amount of stability to the city during his eight years here and has developed an effective team of managers,” Battle Ground Mayor Shane Bowman said in a statement.

Williams’ last day at the helm of Battle Ground’s government will be Dec. 3. The City Council will appoint an interim manager while a search for a permanent hire is launched.

“I am confident that our recruitment process will produce a strong list of candidates, and I am equally confident in the staff we have in place during the interim period,” Bowman said.

Williams starts as Moses Lake city manager Dec. 7.

Under his contract with Moses Lake, Williams will be able to serve as an adviser to Battle Ground for up to two months to help the transition to a new manager.

Williams will be paid $152,500 a year, plus be reimbursed up to $12,500 for relocation costs.

The largest city in Grant County, Moses Lake has a population of 22,080, according to state estimates, and an economy built on agriculture and manufacturing.

“We feel we are very lucky to have him and are very much welcoming his arrival,” said Moses Lake interim City Manager Gilbert Alvarado.

Williams was not made available for comment.

He was appointed by the Battle Ground City Council in 2010 after former city manager Dennis Osborn was fired. Williams had served as deputy city manager in Battle Ground since 2007.

He was a finalist for city manager jobs in Longview and Pasco in the past two years.

Columbian Business Reporter

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