Tuesday, January 25, 2022
Jan. 25, 2022

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Breast Cancer

Irene Gielen and her bull mastiff, Alice, are pictured at her home in Vancouver on Sept. 11. Gielen tested positive for the BRCA1 gene in 2016 and since then has had multiple surgeries to reduce her risk of cancer. Gielen had a double mastectomy first and is currently healing from getting her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed in late August.

Cracking the code on breast cancer risk

Irene Gielen and her bull mastiff, Alice, are pictured at her home in Vancouver on Sept. 11. Gielen tested positive for the BRCA1 gene in 2016 and since then has had multiple surgeries to reduce her risk of cancer. Gielen had a double mastectomy first and is currently healing from getting her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed in late August.

October 7, 2018, 12:02am Breast Cancer

For Irene Gielen, it was better to know. Read story

Washington sues sham breast cancer charity

August 21, 2018, 9:19am Breast Cancer

A court found that a sham charity took millions of dollars from Washington residents donating to help fight breast cancer. Read story

Adine Usher, 78, meets May 24 with breast cancer study leader Dr. Joseph Sparano at the Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx borough of New York. Usher was one of about 10,000 participants in the study which shows women at low or intermediate risk for breast cancer recurrence may safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of survival.

Many breast cancer patients can skip chemo, big study finds

Adine Usher, 78, meets May 24 with breast cancer study leader Dr. Joseph Sparano at the Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx borough of New York. Usher was one of about 10,000 participants in the study which shows women at low or intermediate risk for breast cancer recurrence may safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of survival.

June 3, 2018, 2:20pm Breast Cancer

Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient’s risk. Read story

According to a study released on Wednesday, many women with a common and aggressive form of breast cancer that is treated with Herceptin can get by with six months of the drug instead of the usual 12, greatly reducing the risk of heart damage it can cause. F.

Study backs shorter use of Herceptin

According to a study released on Wednesday, many women with a common and aggressive form of breast cancer that is treated with Herceptin can get by with six months of the drug instead of the usual 12, greatly reducing the risk of heart damage it can cause. F.

May 21, 2018, 6:00am Breast Cancer

Many women with a common and aggressive form of breast cancer that is treated with Herceptin can get by with six months of the drug instead of the usual 12, greatly reducing the risk of heart damage it sometimes can cause, a study suggests. Read story

Special challenges face younger adults battling breast cancer

May 7, 2018, 6:05am Breast Cancer

The lump in Alex Whitaker’s breast appeared out of nowhere. Read story

Dr. Maya Guglin is a University of Kentucky cardiologist.

Breast cancer patients may skirt risk to heart

Dr. Maya Guglin is a University of Kentucky cardiologist.

March 26, 2018, 6:00am Breast Cancer

For years, breast cancer patients on the chemotherapy drug regimen of doxorubicin and Herceptin have risked heart damage. Read story

Laury Giffin tattoos pink cherry blossoms on Laura Hottman’s right breast. Hottman, 54, was diagnosed with breast cancer in May 2015. After a double mastectomy and reconstruction, Hottman opted for decorative tattooing to disguise the scars on her breasts.

Decorative tattoos a symbol of survival following battle with breast cancer

Laury Giffin tattoos pink cherry blossoms on Laura Hottman’s right breast. Hottman, 54, was diagnosed with breast cancer in May 2015. After a double mastectomy and reconstruction, Hottman opted for decorative tattooing to disguise the scars on her breasts.

February 25, 2018, 6:00am Breast Cancer

Laura Hottman never planned on getting tattoos. But the 54-year-old also never planned on getting breast cancer. Read story

Erin Maher is joined onstage by her son, Liam, 3, while she shares her story of battling cancer while pregnant during the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk in October at the University of Portland. Maher was 14 weeks pregnant with her daughter, Illianna, when she was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Cancer-free, woman’s struggle with hope and fear continues

Erin Maher is joined onstage by her son, Liam, 3, while she shares her story of battling cancer while pregnant during the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk in October at the University of Portland. Maher was 14 weeks pregnant with her daughter, Illianna, when she was diagnosed with breast cancer.

February 4, 2018, 6:00am Breast Cancer

Erin Maher waited 496 days to hear if her breast cancer was gone. Read story

Dr. Toni Storm-Dickerson, left, and Dr. Allen Gabriel place the BioZorb implant into the breast of Dr. Anne Peled, a breast cancer surgeon from California, during lumpectomy and oncoplastic surgery Tuesday at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center. The oncoplastic surgery uses breast tissue to fill the void left by the removed tumor. The implant serves as a marker of the cancer location for future radiation treatment.

Breast cancer surgeon diagnosed with breast cancer advocates oncoplastic surgery

Dr. Toni Storm-Dickerson, left, and Dr. Allen Gabriel place the BioZorb implant into the breast of Dr. Anne Peled, a breast cancer surgeon from California, during lumpectomy and oncoplastic surgery Tuesday at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center. The oncoplastic surgery uses breast tissue to fill the void left by the removed tumor. The implant serves as a marker of the cancer location for future radiation treatment.

January 22, 2018, 6:30am Breast Cancer

Dr. Anne Peled never imaged she would be on the other side of the scalpel. Read story

Emerging from breast cancer, mastectomy

January 1, 2018, 6:05am Breast Cancer

When she was diagnosed with breast cancer, Margaret Pelikan had two goals: to get rid of the disease and to feel normal afterward. Her team at Mayo Clinic helped her accomplish both. Read story