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March 2, 2021

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Clark County Life

Guests eat their meals on the downstairs veranda as they listen to live music at the Eatery at the Grant House on Friday afternoon, August 9, 2019.

Eatery at the Grant House in Vancouver closes doors permanently

Guests eat their meals on the downstairs veranda as they listen to live music at the Eatery at the Grant House on Friday afternoon, August 9, 2019.

January 11, 2021, 2:13pm Business

The Eatery at the Grant House has closed its doors permanently, according to a Sunday Facebook post from owners Scott and Sarah Flury. The restaurant’s website has also been updated with a banner message announcing the closure. Read story

Check It Out: Book time in 2021 for a new hobby

January 10, 2021, 6:04am Clark County Life

A new year, a fresh start – that’s what I’m focusing on these days. Who knows what 2021 has in store for us, but I was very happy to take down my 2020 calendars and replace them with brand new, start-from-scratch, chronological markers of 2021. Read story

(iStock)
A Vancouver Barracks mule train returns from the Lacamas Creek artillery range (renamed Camp Bonneville in 1909) along the city streets around 1908. The convoy heads down 10th Street (now Evergreen Boulevard) toward the barracks packing ammunition. The troopers belong to the U.S. Army Mountain Gun Battery, 2nd Field Artillery Regiment stationed here between 1904 and 1913. The steeple of the First Presbyterian Church and the minister's home rise in the background.

Clark County History: Mules and pack animals

A Vancouver Barracks mule train returns from the Lacamas Creek artillery range (renamed Camp Bonneville in 1909) along the city streets around 1908. The convoy heads down 10th Street (now Evergreen Boulevard) toward the barracks packing ammunition. The troopers belong to the U.S. Army Mountain Gun Battery, 2nd Field Artillery Regiment stationed here between 1904 and 1913. The steeple of the First Presbyterian Church and the minister's home rise in the background.

January 10, 2021, 6:00am Clark County Life

Contrary to Hollywood’s horsey version of the West, mules played a big role. Gen. George Crook preferred riding a mule, so did William “Buffalo Bill” Cody and Gen. O. O. Howard. Perhaps filmmakers assumed soldiers, cowboys, gunslingers and lawmen looked more formidable straddling horses instead of mules. Read story

Gene Nordstrom is gone, but his 1940 Packard will always be part of his widow's life, she writes.

Everybody Has a Story: Precious times in classic Packard

Gene Nordstrom is gone, but his 1940 Packard will always be part of his widow's life, she writes.

January 9, 2021, 6:04am Clark County Life

My husband, Gene, always wanted a classic car, specifically a Packard, as his father and grandfather both owned Packards. Read story

Gardening With Allen: Shrubs that keep leaves all year

January 9, 2021, 6:02am Clark County Life

Most of my shrubs lose their leaves in winter. What are some good choices for plants to replace them? Read story

Energy Adviser: Tips to ease winter’s impact on energy bill

January 9, 2021, 6:00am Clark County Life

Many Pacific Northwesterners dread winter for the cold, rainy weather and the seasonal spike in household heating expenses. But, with some careful planning and a few practical solutions, you can ease the squeeze on your home’s energy budget without compromising personal comfort. Read story

Clark County looks for next poet laureate

January 8, 2021, 6:07am Clark County Life

The Clark County Arts Commission is looking for applicants for the county’s next poet laureate. Read story

"The Canyon Cuts Both Ways" is a book of short stories about North Santiam Canyon.

Ridgefield author sets new book in Oregon

"The Canyon Cuts Both Ways" is a book of short stories about North Santiam Canyon.

January 7, 2021, 6:05am Clark County Life

In Dan T. Cox’s fiction, people’s hearts and minds run as deep as Oregon’s North Santiam Canyon, and their relationships and paths through life get just as complicated as that remote, rugged landscape. Read story

Robert B. Irwin (1883-1951) graduated from what was then called the Washington School for Defective Youth in Vancouver. Blinded early in life, he became a blind educator who worked behind the scenes to improve the lives of blind people. He championed standardizing Braille, set up a Braille publishing house and pushed "talking books." Little did he know his recorded books for the blind would launch the audiobook craze decades later.

Clark County History: Robert Irwin, Washington School for Defective Youth graduate

Robert B. Irwin (1883-1951) graduated from what was then called the Washington School for Defective Youth in Vancouver. Blinded early in life, he became a blind educator who worked behind the scenes to improve the lives of blind people. He championed standardizing Braille, set up a Braille publishing house and pushed "talking books." Little did he know his recorded books for the blind would launch the audiobook craze decades later.

January 3, 2021, 6:00am Clark County Life

After an eye infection blinded their 5-year-old son, his parents enrolled him at the Washington School for Defective Youth in Vancouver. In 1901, that boy, Robert B. Irwin, graduated. He earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington, gained a master’s from Harvard, and continued at Harvard to work… Read story