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Nov. 28, 2020

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Nation & World

FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2020, file photo, recently filled graves are seen in the Olifantsveil Cemetery outside Johannesburg, South Africa. The African continent has surpassed 2 million confirmed cases as health officials warn of infections starting to creep up again into a second surge.

Africa CDC sees COVID-19 vaccinations in 2nd quarter of 2021

FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2020, file photo, recently filled graves are seen in the Olifantsveil Cemetery outside Johannesburg, South Africa. The African continent has surpassed 2 million confirmed cases as health officials warn of infections starting to creep up again into a second surge.

November 26, 2020, 8:24am Nation & World

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Vaccinations against COVID-19 in Africa might not start until the second quarter of next year, the continent’s top public health official said Thursday, adding that it will be “extremely dangerous” if more developed parts of the world vaccinate themselves and then restrict travel to people with… Read story

The Schmidt family, from, left, Heather Schmidt, her husband Nicholas Philbrook, son Andrew, 4, father Raymond and daughter Ava interact in their backyard, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, in Camarillo, Calif. Philbrook and his wife have been trying to convince court officials that he should be excused from jury duty because her father, a cancer survivor with diabetes, lives with them. But court officials told him that is not a valid reason and he must appear in court in early December.

Trials delayed as potential jurors duck

The Schmidt family, from, left, Heather Schmidt, her husband Nicholas Philbrook, son Andrew, 4, father Raymond and daughter Ava interact in their backyard, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, in Camarillo, Calif. Philbrook and his wife have been trying to convince court officials that he should be excused from jury duty because her father, a cancer survivor with diabetes, lives with them. But court officials told him that is not a valid reason and he must appear in court in early December.

November 26, 2020, 6:03am Nation & World

HARTFORD, Conn. — Jury duty notices have set Nicholas Philbrook’s home on edge with worries about him contracting the coronavirus and passing it on to his father-in-law, a cancer survivor with diabetes in his mid-70s who is at higher risk of developing serious complications from COVID-19. Read story

The damage done to the Arecibo Observatory by a broken cable that supported a metal platform, creating a 100-foot gash to the radio telescope's reflector dish in Arecibo, Puerto Rico.

Puerto Rico’s huge telescope to close

The damage done to the Arecibo Observatory by a broken cable that supported a metal platform, creating a 100-foot gash to the radio telescope's reflector dish in Arecibo, Puerto Rico.

November 26, 2020, 6:02am Nation & World

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — The National Science Foundation announced Thursday that it will close the huge telescope at the renowned Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico in a blow to scientists worldwide who depend on it to search for planets, asteroids and extraterrestrial life. Read story

Susannah Remillard, middle, speaks to one of her sixth-grade students at Cape Cod Lighthouse Charter School, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, in East Harwich, Mass. In a growing number of U.S. schools, students are now learning a more complex Thanksgiving story that involves conflict, injustice and a new focus on the native people who lived in New England for hundreds of years before European settlers arrived.

New tack for teaching about Thanksgiving

Susannah Remillard, middle, speaks to one of her sixth-grade students at Cape Cod Lighthouse Charter School, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, in East Harwich, Mass. In a growing number of U.S. schools, students are now learning a more complex Thanksgiving story that involves conflict, injustice and a new focus on the native people who lived in New England for hundreds of years before European settlers arrived.

November 26, 2020, 6:01am Nation & World

BOSTON — A friendly feast shared by the plucky Pilgrims and their native neighbors? That’s yesterday’s Thanksgiving story. Read story

Prayer flags flutter in the breeze at Mount Everest.

Scientists find plastic fibers in Mount Everest snow samples

Prayer flags flutter in the breeze at Mount Everest.

November 26, 2020, 6:00am Nation & World

KATHMANDU, Nepal — Scientists have identified the highest instance of microplastics ever found on Earth, near the summit of Mount Everest. Read story

In this photo taken Thursday, Oct 23, 2003, a man pushes his bicycle past the cover of a magazine showing China's first man in space, Yang Liwei and the Chinese characters for "How far are we from the moon?" at a newsstand in Beijing, China. China's Nov. 24, 2020, trip to the moon and, presumably, back is the latest milestone in the Asian powerhouse's slow but steady ascent to the stars.

Lunar mission a milestone in China’s space ambitions

In this photo taken Thursday, Oct 23, 2003, a man pushes his bicycle past the cover of a magazine showing China's first man in space, Yang Liwei and the Chinese characters for "How far are we from the moon?" at a newsstand in Beijing, China. China's Nov. 24, 2020, trip to the moon and, presumably, back is the latest milestone in the Asian powerhouse's slow but steady ascent to the stars.

November 26, 2020, 6:00am Nation & World

WENCHANG, China — China’s latest trip to the moon is another milestone in the Asian powerhouse’s slow but steady ascent to the stars. Read story

FILE- In this March 24, 2020 file photo, a woman reaches for yogurt wearing gloves during senior shopping hours at Homeland in Oklahoma City. To avoid any traces of the coronavirus that might be lurking on surfaces, Americans have been wiping down groceries, wearing surgical gloves in public and leaving mail packages out for an extra day or two. But experts say fear of being infected by touching something can be overblown.

Wiping down groceries? Experts say keep risk in perspective

FILE- In this March 24, 2020 file photo, a woman reaches for yogurt wearing gloves during senior shopping hours at Homeland in Oklahoma City. To avoid any traces of the coronavirus that might be lurking on surfaces, Americans have been wiping down groceries, wearing surgical gloves in public and leaving mail packages out for an extra day or two. But experts say fear of being infected by touching something can be overblown.

November 25, 2020, 6:57pm Health

NEW YORK (AP) — Cleaning wipes are harder to find on store shelves, and businesses are reassuring customers with stepped up sanitation measures. In New York, the subway system is shut down nightly for disinfecting. Read story

A woman show a banner reading "alive, free and without debts" during a demonstration on the occasion of International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, in Rome, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020.

Global push to end domestic violence, worse amid COVID-19

A woman show a banner reading "alive, free and without debts" during a demonstration on the occasion of International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, in Rome, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020.

November 25, 2020, 6:00pm Nation & World

BRUSSELS — In a global push to end violence against women, activists held rallies Wednesday and world leaders called for action to stop the abuse, which has worsened because of the coronavirus pandemic this year. Read story

A 911 hoax described a mass shooter at a school. It was a ‘bored’ teen, cops say

November 25, 2020, 4:31pm Nation & World

MIAMI — Police say a bored teenager is to blame for a hoax 911 call claiming a gunman was rampaging through a Hialeah, Florida, charter school, forcing a lockdown, terrifying students and spurring SWAT officers to rush to the campus. Read story

In a photo provided by Carolyn Plotts, Eric Kuhlman, 3, helps master of ceremonies Stan Miller draw names for the annual Norcator drawing held in Norcatur, Kan. For the 150 or so people who still call the rural hamlet home, the cancellation this year of the town's beloved Norcatur Christmas Drawing has shone a spotlight on a global coronavirus pandemic that has reached deep into rural America.

Christmas traditions axed as pandemic sweeps rural Kansas

In a photo provided by Carolyn Plotts, Eric Kuhlman, 3, helps master of ceremonies Stan Miller draw names for the annual Norcator drawing held in Norcatur, Kan. For the 150 or so people who still call the rural hamlet home, the cancellation this year of the town's beloved Norcatur Christmas Drawing has shone a spotlight on a global coronavirus pandemic that has reached deep into rural America.

November 25, 2020, 2:45pm Nation & World

BELLE PLAINE, Kan. — It’s barely a town anymore, battered by time on the windswept prairie of northwest Kansas. COVID-19 still managed to find Norcatur. Read story