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Nov. 28, 2020

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Nation & World

Congress closer to averting Dec. 11 federal shutdown

November 24, 2020, 10:24pm Nation & World

WASHINGTON — Top appropriators reached bipartisan agreement Tuesday on a framework for an omnibus spending package that would avoid a partial government shutdown next month. Read story

President Donald Trump, followed by Vice President Mike Pence, left, walks into the briefing room at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020, to make a statement.

Trump vents about election as agencies aid Biden transition

President Donald Trump, followed by Vice President Mike Pence, left, walks into the briefing room at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020, to make a statement.

November 24, 2020, 10:23pm Nation & World

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump insisted Tuesday that he is not giving up his fight to overturn the election results, but across the federal government, preparations were beginning in earnest to support President-elect Joe Biden’s incoming administration. Read story

Nurse Teri Wheat poses for a photo in Fort Worth, Texas, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. As Wheat recently made her rounds at a Texas maternity ward, she began to realize she was having a hard time understanding the new mothers who were wearing masks due to the coronavirus pandemic. Hearing specialists across the U.S. say they have seen an uptick in visits from people like Wheat, who only realized how much they relied on lip reading and facial expressions when people started wearing masks that cover the nose and mouth.

Can you repeat that? Hearing trouble more obvious with masks

Nurse Teri Wheat poses for a photo in Fort Worth, Texas, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. As Wheat recently made her rounds at a Texas maternity ward, she began to realize she was having a hard time understanding the new mothers who were wearing masks due to the coronavirus pandemic. Hearing specialists across the U.S. say they have seen an uptick in visits from people like Wheat, who only realized how much they relied on lip reading and facial expressions when people started wearing masks that cover the nose and mouth.

November 24, 2020, 6:00pm Nation & World

DALLAS — As nurse Teri Wheat made her rounds at a Texas maternity ward, she began to realize she was having a hard time understanding the new mothers who were wearing masks due to the coronavirus pandemic. Read story

Tigray refugees who fled the conflict in Ethiopia's Tigray region, wait to get cooked rice served by Sudanese local volunteers at Um Rakuba refugee camp in Qadarif, eastern Sudan, Monday, Nov. 23, 2020. Tens of thousands of  people have fled a conflict in Ethiopia for Sudan, sometimes so quickly they had to leave family behind. There is not enough to feed them in the remote area of southern Sudan that they rushed to.

‘We just ran’: Ethiopians fleeing war find little relief

Tigray refugees who fled the conflict in Ethiopia's Tigray region, wait to get cooked rice served by Sudanese local volunteers at Um Rakuba refugee camp in Qadarif, eastern Sudan, Monday, Nov. 23, 2020. Tens of thousands of  people have fled a conflict in Ethiopia for Sudan, sometimes so quickly they had to leave family behind. There is not enough to feed them in the remote area of southern Sudan that they rushed to.

November 24, 2020, 2:15pm Nation & World

UMM RAKOUBA, Sudan — The baby was born on the run from war. Her first bath was in a puddle. Now she cries all night in a country that is not her own. Read story

FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020 file photo, manager Yllka Murati waits for a delivery driver to pick up takeout orders behind a partition displaying a sign to remind customers to wear a mask, at the Penrose Diner, in south Philadelphia. Despite the expected arrival of COVID-19 vaccines in just a few weeks, it could take several months -- probably well into 2021 -- before things get back to something close to normal in the U.S. and Americans can once again go to the movies, cheer at an NBA game or give Grandma a hug.

Restaurant workers out of work again as virus surges anew

FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020 file photo, manager Yllka Murati waits for a delivery driver to pick up takeout orders behind a partition displaying a sign to remind customers to wear a mask, at the Penrose Diner, in south Philadelphia. Despite the expected arrival of COVID-19 vaccines in just a few weeks, it could take several months -- probably well into 2021 -- before things get back to something close to normal in the U.S. and Americans can once again go to the movies, cheer at an NBA game or give Grandma a hug.

November 24, 2020, 1:34pm Health

Waiters and bartenders are being thrown out of work – again – as governors and local officials shut down indoor dining and drinking establishments to combat the nationwide surge in coronavirus infections that is overwhelming hospitals and dashing hopes for a quick economic recovery. Read story

FILE - In this Tuesday, May 8, 2007, file photo, a Purdue Pharma logo is affixed to part of a Purdue building in Stamford, Conn. Proposed settlements between the federal government and OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma and its owners cleared a major legal hurdle Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, when a bankruptcy judge said they could move ahead.

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma pleads guilty in criminal case

FILE - In this Tuesday, May 8, 2007, file photo, a Purdue Pharma logo is affixed to part of a Purdue building in Stamford, Conn. Proposed settlements between the federal government and OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma and its owners cleared a major legal hurdle Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, when a bankruptcy judge said they could move ahead.

November 24, 2020, 10:48am Business

Purdue Pharma pleaded guilty Tuesday to three criminal charges, formally admitting its role in an opioid epidemic that has contributed to hundreds of thousands of deaths over the past two decades. Read story

FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020 file photo, manager Yllka Murati waits for a delivery driver to pick up takeout orders behind a partition displaying a sign to remind customers to wear a mask, at the Penrose Diner, in south Philadelphia. Despite the expected arrival of COVID-19 vaccines in just a few weeks, it could take several months -- probably well into 2021 -- before things get back to something close to normal in the U.S. and Americans can once again go to the movies, cheer at an NBA game or give Grandma a hug.

Keep the mask: A vaccine won’t end the U.S. crisis right away

FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020 file photo, manager Yllka Murati waits for a delivery driver to pick up takeout orders behind a partition displaying a sign to remind customers to wear a mask, at the Penrose Diner, in south Philadelphia. Despite the expected arrival of COVID-19 vaccines in just a few weeks, it could take several months -- probably well into 2021 -- before things get back to something close to normal in the U.S. and Americans can once again go to the movies, cheer at an NBA game or give Grandma a hug.

November 24, 2020, 10:43am Nation & World

NEW YORK — Don’t even think of putting the mask away anytime soon. Read story

FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 2, 1990, file photo, David Dinkins delivers his first speech as mayor of New York, in New York. Dinkins, New York City's first African-American mayor, died Monday, Nov. 23, 2020. He was 93.

New York City’s first Black mayor, David Dinkins, dies at 93

FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 2, 1990, file photo, David Dinkins delivers his first speech as mayor of New York, in New York. Dinkins, New York City's first African-American mayor, died Monday, Nov. 23, 2020. He was 93.

November 24, 2020, 10:16am Nation & World

NEW YORK — David Dinkins, who broke barriers as New York City’s first African American mayor but was doomed to a single term by a soaring murder rate, stubborn unemployment and his mishandling of a riot in Brooklyn, has died. He was 93. Read story

This undated photo provided by the Sarpy County Jail shows Roberto Carlos Silva, of Omaha, who was arrested in connection to an attack at a Nebraska fast food restaurant in which two people were shot and killed and two were wounded. Silva was booked into jail early Sunday, Nov. 22, 2020 on suspicion of first-degree homicide and arson charges in the attack Saturday night at a Sonic Drive-in in the Omaha suburb of Bellevue.

Bond denied in fatal attack at Nebraska fast food restaurant

This undated photo provided by the Sarpy County Jail shows Roberto Carlos Silva, of Omaha, who was arrested in connection to an attack at a Nebraska fast food restaurant in which two people were shot and killed and two were wounded. Silva was booked into jail early Sunday, Nov. 22, 2020 on suspicion of first-degree homicide and arson charges in the attack Saturday night at a Sonic Drive-in in the Omaha suburb of Bellevue.

November 24, 2020, 9:30am Nation & World

PAPILLION, Neb. (AP) — A 23-year-old man charged with fatally shooting two employees at a Nebraska fast food restaurant and wounding two others was denied bond Tuesday at his first court appearance. Read story

Prosecutors: 31 charged in Coast Guard test-fixing scheme

November 24, 2020, 8:29am Nation & World

NEW ORLEANS — More than 30 people were charged for their participation in a test score-fixing scheme that happened over seven years at a United States Coast Guard exam center in Louisiana, federal prosecutors announced. Read story