Friday, January 22, 2021
Jan. 22, 2021

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Northwest

Seattle Seahawks' Marshawn Lynch begins to celebrate after a 67-yard touchdown run against the New Orleans Saints on Jan. 8, 2011, in Seattle.

‘Beast Quake’ reverberates: 10 years after TD run shook Seattle, science sees benefits

Seattle Seahawks' Marshawn Lynch begins to celebrate after a 67-yard touchdown run against the New Orleans Saints on Jan. 8, 2011, in Seattle.

January 17, 2021, 6:02am Latest News

SEATTLE — “The crowd is silent now, as opposed to when the Saints have the ball,” NBC broadcaster Tom Hammond said, before more than 66,000 fans refuted that fact. Read story

People along the Redmond Watershed Preserve on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2020.

Redmond preserve’s trails beckon

People along the Redmond Watershed Preserve on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2020.

January 17, 2021, 6:00am Northwest

SEATTLE — If Bridle Trails State Park is the ultimate Seattle-area trail run for beginners, Redmond Watershed Preserve is the logical next step. The Washington State Parks website touts its “28 miles of well-maintained trails suitable for recreational horseback riding, walking, jogging, nature observing and general spiritual renewal.” Read story

A snowmobiler rides around a clearing at Wanoga Sno-park in Bend. Ore.

Where to go snowmobiling?

A snowmobiler rides around a clearing at Wanoga Sno-park in Bend. Ore.

January 17, 2021, 5:49am Northwest

BEND, Ore. — For a quarter of a century Jim Valentine, the president of Ochoco Snow Sports, a Prineville snowmobile club, has been enjoying snowmobiling trails all around Oregon. Read story

3.5 million acres removed from northern spotted owl critical habitat

January 16, 2021, 6:21pm Northwest

Jan. 15—In a win for the timber industry, “critical habitat” designated for the threatened northern spotted owl will shrink significantly — by about 3.5 million acres — in the Pacific Northwest. Read story

Discovery Channel show will spotlight 1985 Spokane homicide solved last year

January 16, 2021, 6:19pm Northwest

In 1985, police found the body of Marsi Belecz, 12, in a Spokane junkyard. She’d been raped, stabbed more than 25 times and her throat was cut. Read story

Seattle’s police watchdog agency finds ‘multiple’ offenses in officers’ response to racial justice protests

January 16, 2021, 5:52pm Northwest

Seattle police used improper force when officers separately hurled a tear-gas canister at a TV news crew and blast balls that injured two people during demonstrations against racial injustice on Capitol Hill last June, the city’s police watchdog announced Friday. Read story

Eric Holder to review equity issues at Seattle Children’s

January 16, 2021, 1:44pm Northwest

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle Children's hospital is bringing in a big name to review its policies and practices surrounding institutional racism, equity and inclusion: former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. Read story

Restaurant co-owner Liz Mitchell works behind the bar at the Carver Hangar in Boring, Ore., on Jan. 6, 2021. As coronavirus deaths soar, a growing number of restaurants like Carver Hangar in states across the country are reopening in defiance of strict COVID-19 rules that have shut them down for indoor dining for weeks, or even months.

Defiance of virus dining bans grows as restaurants flounder

Restaurant co-owner Liz Mitchell works behind the bar at the Carver Hangar in Boring, Ore., on Jan. 6, 2021. As coronavirus deaths soar, a growing number of restaurants like Carver Hangar in states across the country are reopening in defiance of strict COVID-19 rules that have shut them down for indoor dining for weeks, or even months.

January 16, 2021, 10:30am Editor's Choice

BORING, Ore. — A line formed out the door during the lunch rush at the Carver Hangar, a family-owned restaurant and sports bar, and waitresses zipped in and out of the kitchen trying to keep up with orders as customers backed up in the lobby. Read story

FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo, Trump supporters gather outside the Capitol in Washington. As rioters converged on the U.S. Capitol building, the grounds normally hailed as the seat of American democracy became a melting pot of extremist groups. Militia members, white supremacists, paramilitary organizations and fervent supporters of outgoing President Donald Trump stood shoulder to shoulder, unified in rage. Experts say years of increasing partisanship and a growing fascination of paramilitary groups combined with the coronavirus pandemic to create a conveyor belt of radicalization.

Mix of extremists who stormed Capitol isn’t retreating

FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo, Trump supporters gather outside the Capitol in Washington. As rioters converged on the U.S. Capitol building, the grounds normally hailed as the seat of American democracy became a melting pot of extremist groups. Militia members, white supremacists, paramilitary organizations and fervent supporters of outgoing President Donald Trump stood shoulder to shoulder, unified in rage. Experts say years of increasing partisanship and a growing fascination of paramilitary groups combined with the coronavirus pandemic to create a conveyor belt of radicalization.

January 16, 2021, 6:00am Latest News

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — As rioters laid siege to the U.S. Capitol, the seat of American democracy became a melting pot of extremist groups: militia members, white supremacists, paramilitary organizations, anti-maskers and fanatical supporters of President Donald Trump, standing shoulder to shoulder in rage. Read story

A couple stops to look at the Oregon State Capitol, whose first-floor windows have been boarded up Friday in Salem, Ore. Large cement blocks have also been placed in front of the building, which has been closed to the public since March because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Courtney laments that Oregon Capitol has become ‘fortress’

A couple stops to look at the Oregon State Capitol, whose first-floor windows have been boarded up Friday in Salem, Ore. Large cement blocks have also been placed in front of the building, which has been closed to the public since March because of the coronavirus pandemic.

January 15, 2021, 7:17pm Northwest

While Oregon Capitol leadership have agreed to mostly delay the upcoming legislative session by two days due to threats that followed the siege of the nation’s Capitol building in Washington, D.C, lawmakers remain split on dealing with another threat: the COVID-19 pandemic. Read story