Tuesday, September 27, 2022
Sept. 27, 2022

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In a partnership project between Oregon State University and the Cascade Forest Conservancy, 72 motion-detecting wildlife cameras in camouflaged metal boxes were locked to trees in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest north of Mount St. Helens. The cameras took thousands of photographs of resident wildlife over three years. In August, volunteers with the Cascade Forest Conservancy tracked down nearly all the cameras, downloaded their data and removed them.

Watching the woods: Volunteers track down wildlife cameras hidden in Gifford Pinchot forest

In a partnership project between Oregon State University and the Cascade Forest Conservancy, 72 motion-detecting wildlife cameras in camouflaged metal boxes were locked to trees in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest north of Mount St. Helens. The cameras took thousands of photographs of resident wildlife over three years. In August, volunteers with the Cascade Forest Conservancy tracked down nearly all the cameras, downloaded their data and removed them.

September 4, 2022, 6:03am Clark County Life

For three years, dozens of camouflaged cameras staked out remote corners of this rugged forest, waiting for its inhabitants to wander into view. Read story

Attention small forest landowners: State launches a tool just for you

September 2, 2022, 7:44am Latest News

Those who own private forestland in rural areas of Washington now have a quicker way to get financial help and advice from forest health experts after a state agency launched a comprehensive online tool for landowners on Tuesday. Read story

Barbless hooks, required for Columbia salmon fishing, are unforgiving if you handle the fish wrong.

All salmon fishing now closed below Bonneville Dam

Barbless hooks, required for Columbia salmon fishing, are unforgiving if you handle the fish wrong.

September 1, 2022, 3:27pm Latest News

Fishery managers from Oregon and Washington closed all salmon and steelhead fishing, including both retention and catch-and-release fishing, on the Columbia River from Buoy 10 to Bonneville Dam as of 11:59 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1. Read story

Lucienne de Boer (left) and Melissa Peterson with Buoy 10 Chinook they caught recently while fishing with guide Bob Rees. Chinook fishing was too good this year, and the states were forced to close the fishery for Chinook. Coho remains open.

Chinook fishing too good as Buoy 10 closes

Lucienne de Boer (left) and Melissa Peterson with Buoy 10 Chinook they caught recently while fishing with guide Bob Rees. Chinook fishing was too good this year, and the states were forced to close the fishery for Chinook. Coho remains open.

August 31, 2022, 9:30pm Outdoors

The Buoy 10 salmon fishery at the mouth of the Columbia River has been a victim of its own success. Read story

Salmon fishermen on the Columbia River.

Columbia River and tributary fishing report, Aug. 22-28

Salmon fishermen on the Columbia River.

August 31, 2022, 4:08pm Outdoors

From the Lower Columbia River Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam, there were 935 salmonid boats and 166 Washington bank rods were tallied during the Aug. 27 flight count. Read story

The Buoy 10 fishery at the mouth of the Columbia River is the largest salmon fishery in the Lower 48.

Buoy 10 fishery closing to Chinook retention on Aug. 31

The Buoy 10 fishery at the mouth of the Columbia River is the largest salmon fishery in the Lower 48.

August 30, 2022, 2:57pm Latest News

Fishery managers from Washington and Oregon announced Monday that the Columbia River’s Buoy 10 fishery will close for Chinook salmon retention beginning Wednesday, Aug. 31. Read story

FILE - In this May 15, 2019 photo, the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River is seen from the air near Colfax, Wash. A report released Thursday, June 9, 2022, said the benefits provided by four giant hydroelectric dams on the Snake River in Washington state can be replaced if the dams are breached to save endangered salmon runs. But finding other ways to provide electricity, irrigation and enabling commerce would cost up to $27.2 billion, the report said. (AP Photo/Ted S.

Report: Benefits of Snake River dams must be replaced before breaching

FILE - In this May 15, 2019 photo, the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River is seen from the air near Colfax, Wash. A report released Thursday, June 9, 2022, said the benefits provided by four giant hydroelectric dams on the Snake River in Washington state can be replaced if the dams are breached to save endangered salmon runs. But finding other ways to provide electricity, irrigation and enabling commerce would cost up to $27.2 billion, the report said. (AP Photo/Ted S.

August 25, 2022, 3:17pm Latest News

The benefits provided by four giant hydroelectric dams on the Snake River must be replaced before the dams can be breached to save endangered salmon runs, according to a final report issued Thursday by Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and Washington U.S. Sen. Patty Murray. Read story

Salmon fishermen on the Columbia River.

Columbia River and tributary fishing report, Aug. 15-21

Salmon fishermen on the Columbia River.

August 24, 2022, 3:18pm Outdoors

From the Lower Columbia River Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Bonneville Dam, there were 465 salmonid boats and 61 Washington bank rods were tallied during the Aug. 20 flight count. Read story