Thursday, December 8, 2022
Dec. 8, 2022

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Clark County History

Oregon Historical Society chronicles tale of Jantzen Beach carousel

December 4, 2022, 6:03am Clark County Life

The bejeweled wooden horses of the Jantzen Beach Carousel delighted children for eight decades on Hayden Island, first as part of an amusement park, then as a shopping mall attraction. Read story

Clark County History: Libraries and reading rooms

December 4, 2022, 6:00am Clark County Life

The Hudson’s Bay Company enjoyed two libraries at Fort Vancouver during the 1830s and 1840s. Both might lay claim as the first north of the Columbia River. Read story

This week in Clark County History

December 2, 2022, 6:05am Clark County Life

A weekly look back compiled by the Clark County Historical Museum from The Columbian archives available at columbian.newspapers.com or at the museum. Read story

Benjamin F. Shaw (1826-1908) outlived all other white men who fought in the Northwest Wars on Native Americans. He fought in the Cayuse War of 1847 and was the last participant in the Yakima War of 1855-56 to die. Shaw was a one-time businessman, translator, and signatory of five treaties. He lived in Vancouver and served as Clark County treasurer and Washington Territorial senator.

Clark County History: Benjamin Shaw

Benjamin F. Shaw (1826-1908) outlived all other white men who fought in the Northwest Wars on Native Americans. He fought in the Cayuse War of 1847 and was the last participant in the Yakima War of 1855-56 to die. Shaw was a one-time businessman, translator, and signatory of five treaties. He lived in Vancouver and served as Clark County treasurer and Washington Territorial senator.

November 27, 2022, 6:00am Clark County Life

Benjamin Shaw earned his place in history by shedding Native American blood. At 15 years old, the Missourian traveled west with his family, settling in what is today Marion County, Ore., in 1844. He and his father, William, fought four years later with the Oregon Regiment in the Cayuse War.… Read story

Chinook Indian Nation Vice Chairman and Vancouver resident Sam Robinson drums and sings during a rally in favor of federal tribal recognition for Chinook on Oct. 7 at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Lack of federal recognition deprives Chinook people of vital resources, they argued during the rally, and continues a long-standing historical injustice that's tantamount to genocide.

Denied, dispersed, disadvantaged: Chinook tribe pursues centuries-old fight for federal recognition

Chinook Indian Nation Vice Chairman and Vancouver resident Sam Robinson drums and sings during a rally in favor of federal tribal recognition for Chinook on Oct. 7 at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Lack of federal recognition deprives Chinook people of vital resources, they argued during the rally, and continues a long-standing historical injustice that's tantamount to genocide.

November 24, 2022, 6:05am Clark County Life

When Sam Robinson arrives at a public event in his distinctive cone-shaped Chinook hat to sing, play his drum and tell stories, what seems like a cultural, broadly spiritual moment is something else too: a political protest. Read story

An unknown woman on an unspecified date paints a likeness of the old Hudson's Bay Company flag for an event at the Fort Vancouver site. The visible first letter of the Hudson's Bay Company's Latin motto shows. The phrase "Pro Belle Cutum" literally means "for beautiful skin." Not fully visible are the two stags and four beavers that are part of the Hudson's Bay Company coat of arms and clarify the kinds of skin intended.

Clark County History: Hudson’s Bay Company flag

An unknown woman on an unspecified date paints a likeness of the old Hudson's Bay Company flag for an event at the Fort Vancouver site. The visible first letter of the Hudson's Bay Company's Latin motto shows. The phrase "Pro Belle Cutum" literally means "for beautiful skin." Not fully visible are the two stags and four beavers that are part of the Hudson's Bay Company coat of arms and clarify the kinds of skin intended.

November 20, 2022, 6:00am Clark County Life

Rotting and crumbling, Fort Vancouver burned to the ground in 1866. When the British pulled out in 1860, they left the fort in American hands. Never fans of the British, the American military neglected its maintenance. Very likely, the derelict fort stood out as an eyesore next to the well-maintained… Read story

This week in Clark County history

November 18, 2022, 5:17am Clark County Life

A weekly look back compiled by the Clark County Historical Museum from The Columbian archives available at columbian.newspapers.com or at the museum. Read story

Harry Generaux, who served in World War II as a bomber pilot, flew more than 30 missions during his service between September 1942 and January 1945.

Vancouver WWII pilot, 99, flew 36 missions

Harry Generaux, who served in World War II as a bomber pilot, flew more than 30 missions during his service between September 1942 and January 1945.

November 11, 2022, 6:00am Clark County News

Old World War II movies attempted to capture the grit of serving on a bomber crew, but Hollywood glamor couldn’t capture its harsh reality. Read story

On this day in Clark County history

November 10, 2022, 6:02am Clark County Life

100 years ago Read story

After the Bannock War, Sarah Winnemucca (1844-1891) assisted the prisoners of war held by Gen. O.O. Howard at the Vancouver Barracks. The loss of her Paiute homeland after the war turned her into an activist, kicking off a series of national lecture tours explaining how white abuse and Christian duplicity was destroying her people. She was also the first Native American woman to pen an autobiography.

Clark County History: Sarah Winnemucca

After the Bannock War, Sarah Winnemucca (1844-1891) assisted the prisoners of war held by Gen. O.O. Howard at the Vancouver Barracks. The loss of her Paiute homeland after the war turned her into an activist, kicking off a series of national lecture tours explaining how white abuse and Christian duplicity was destroying her people. She was also the first Native American woman to pen an autobiography.

November 6, 2022, 6:04am Clark County Life

The most famous Native American woman activist and writer of the 19th century hired Joseph Fletcher, a Vancouver attorney, to write and send a letter to The Oregonian on Dec. 16, 1880. Fletcher’s letter asked the Portland newspaper to republish it and halt any uncertainty about her divorce being refused… Read story