Tuesday, March 2, 2021
March 2, 2021

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FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2021, file photo, empty vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are seen at a vaccination center at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, in Las Vegas. The makers of COVID-19 vaccines are figuring out how to tweak their recipes against worrisome virus mutations -- if and when the shots need an update.

COVID-19 shots might be tweaked if variants get worse

FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2021, file photo, empty vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are seen at a vaccination center at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, in Las Vegas. The makers of COVID-19 vaccines are figuring out how to tweak their recipes against worrisome virus mutations -- if and when the shots need an update.

February 15, 2021, 8:35am Health

The makers of COVID-19 vaccines are figuring out how to tweak their recipes against worrisome virus mutations — and regulators are looking to flu as a blueprint if and when the shots need an update. Read story

This image shows the main page of the HealthCare.gov website on Monday, Feb. 15, 2021.  Health insurance shoppers stuck in a bad plan or unable to find coverage have a new option for help. A sign-up window opened Monday for government insurance markets and runs through May 15 in most U.S. states.

New enrollment window opens for health insurance shoppers

This image shows the main page of the HealthCare.gov website on Monday, Feb. 15, 2021.  Health insurance shoppers stuck in a bad plan or unable to find coverage have a new option for help. A sign-up window opened Monday for government insurance markets and runs through May 15 in most U.S. states.

February 15, 2021, 8:20am Business

Health insurance shoppers stuck in a bad plan or unable to find coverage have a new option for help. Read story

Motorists wait in line to enter a COVID-19 vaccination site at the University Mall parking garage in Tampa on Thursday, Feb. 11, 2021. The traffic was backed up for at least one mile onto Fowler Street.

U.S. vaccine effort opts for stadium clinics over doctors’ offices

Motorists wait in line to enter a COVID-19 vaccination site at the University Mall parking garage in Tampa on Thursday, Feb. 11, 2021. The traffic was backed up for at least one mile onto Fowler Street.

February 14, 2021, 2:45pm Health

WASHINGTON — Daniel Duncanson, the chief executive of a physician practice in Florida, finally got some COVID-19 vaccines for his front-line workers after haggling with a major hospital. But it’s not clear when more are coming amid a shift in strategy from health care providers to massive vaccination sites. Read story

‘I put my life on hold’: Disability groups plead for vaccine

February 14, 2021, 1:44pm Health

Though many people with disabilities are more vulnerable to COVID-19, in some U.S. states they fear being left behind in a massive effort to get limited vaccines into the arms of those who need them most. Read story

FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021 file photo, law enforcement personnel walk toward the Allina Health clinic where multiple people were shot in Buffalo, Minn. Doctors say they're facing increasing threats of violence for refusing to prescribe opioids or trying to wean patients off the addictive painkillers. The issue was underscored by Tuesday's shooting at the Minnesota clinic.

Doctors who say no to opioid use face threats from patients

FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021 file photo, law enforcement personnel walk toward the Allina Health clinic where multiple people were shot in Buffalo, Minn. Doctors say they're facing increasing threats of violence for refusing to prescribe opioids or trying to wean patients off the addictive painkillers. The issue was underscored by Tuesday's shooting at the Minnesota clinic.

February 14, 2021, 1:36pm Health

One patient threatened to shoot Dr. Terry Hunt if physical therapy didn't relieve his pain as effectively as opioids did. Another harassed his staff, then roamed a hospital searching for Hunt after being told he would be weaned off painkillers he had used inappropriately. Read story

FILE - In this an. 24, 2021, file photo, people stand near a sign as they wait in line to receive the first of two doses of the Pfizer vaccine for COVID-19 at a one-day vaccination clinic set up in an Amazon.com facility in Seattle and operated by Virginia Mason Franciscan Health. Scientists say it's still too early to predict the future of the coronavirus, but many doubt it will ever go away entirely. (AP Photo/Ted S.

Virus may never go away but could change into mild annoyance

FILE - In this an. 24, 2021, file photo, people stand near a sign as they wait in line to receive the first of two doses of the Pfizer vaccine for COVID-19 at a one-day vaccination clinic set up in an Amazon.com facility in Seattle and operated by Virginia Mason Franciscan Health. Scientists say it's still too early to predict the future of the coronavirus, but many doubt it will ever go away entirely. (AP Photo/Ted S.

February 14, 2021, 1:27pm Health

NEW DELHI — What if COVID-19 never goes away? Read story

Roseland Community Hospital RN Rhonda Jones, prepares bed linens, towels and a hospital gown Friday, Jan. 29, 2021, for a new patient at the South Side of Chicago hospital. Jones has treated many patients with severe COVID-19, a relative died from it, and her mother and a nephew were infected and recovered, but she is still holding out getting the vaccine.

Black hospital faces vaccine mistrust from unlikely source

Roseland Community Hospital RN Rhonda Jones, prepares bed linens, towels and a hospital gown Friday, Jan. 29, 2021, for a new patient at the South Side of Chicago hospital. Jones has treated many patients with severe COVID-19, a relative died from it, and her mother and a nephew were infected and recovered, but she is still holding out getting the vaccine.

February 12, 2021, 12:45pm Health

CHICAGO — In a makeshift vaccination center at a safety-net Chicago hospital, a patient services aide ushers an older woman with a cane toward a curtained cubicle. Read story

COVID vaccinations in Washington: Numbers lag for Black, Hispanic, multiracial people

February 11, 2021, 5:32pm Health

Washington state health leaders say as the state closes in on the 1 million vaccination mark, a new report shows disproportionately low percentages of Hispanic, Black and multiracial people have received it. Read story

FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021 file photo, a state legislator adjusts her face masks while asking a question at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. A government study released on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021, finds that wearing two masks can better than one, in protecting against coronavirus infection. But health officials are stopping short of recommending that everyone double-up. "The first challenge is to get as many as people as possible masking. And then for those that do mask, to help them get the best benefit out of that mask," said Dr. John Brooks of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (AP Photo/Rogelio V.

CDC study finds two masks are better than one vs. COVID-19

FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021 file photo, a state legislator adjusts her face masks while asking a question at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. A government study released on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021, finds that wearing two masks can better than one, in protecting against coronavirus infection. But health officials are stopping short of recommending that everyone double-up. "The first challenge is to get as many as people as possible masking. And then for those that do mask, to help them get the best benefit out of that mask," said Dr. John Brooks of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (AP Photo/Rogelio V.

February 10, 2021, 8:32am Health

NEW YORK — U.S. government researchers found that two masks are better than one in slowing coronavirus spread, but health officials stopped short of recommending that everyone double up. Read story

Peter Ben Embarek and Thea Koelsen Fischer of the World Health Organization team prepares to board a plane from the tarmac at the airport to leave at the end of the WHO mission in Wuhan, China, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021.

EXPLAINER: What the WHO coronavirus experts learned in Wuhan

Peter Ben Embarek and Thea Koelsen Fischer of the World Health Organization team prepares to board a plane from the tarmac at the airport to leave at the end of the WHO mission in Wuhan, China, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021.

February 10, 2021, 8:25am Health

WUHAN, China — A World Health Organization team is leaving China on Wednesday after gaining some new insights into the origins of the coronavirus pandemic that has now killed more than 2.3 million people worldwide — but with the major questions still unanswered. Read story