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March 1, 2021

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Handful of Washington schools are rapid testing staff, students for COVID-19. Is it working?

February 8, 2021, 7:53am Health

Every week, about two-thirds of teachers and staff in the White River School District, south of Enumclaw, voluntarily head to the school gymnasium or commons. There, nurses with swabs in hand test them for COVID-19. Read story

Washington’s immigrant and refugee elders face challenges COVID-19 vaccine access

February 8, 2021, 7:51am Health

By early December, Trang Tu had quarantined with her mother in their Seattle home for nearly a year, providing round-the-clock supervision for the 90-year-old with advanced dementia that would have been too costly at a nursing facility. Read story

Mortuary owner Brian Simmons holds a photo of his daughter Rhonda Ketchum who died before Christmas of COVID-19, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021, in Springfield, Mo. Simmons has been making more trips to homes to pick up bodies to be cremated and embalmed since the pandemic hit. For many families, home is a better setting than the terrifying scenario of saying farewell to loved ones behind glass or during video calls amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In pandemic, more people choose to die at home

Mortuary owner Brian Simmons holds a photo of his daughter Rhonda Ketchum who died before Christmas of COVID-19, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021, in Springfield, Mo. Simmons has been making more trips to homes to pick up bodies to be cremated and embalmed since the pandemic hit. For many families, home is a better setting than the terrifying scenario of saying farewell to loved ones behind glass or during video calls amid the coronavirus pandemic.

February 7, 2021, 3:00pm Health

MISSION, Kan. — Mortuary owner Brian Simmons has been making more trips to homes to pick up bodies to be cremated and embalmed since the pandemic hit. Read story

President Joe Biden speaks with House Democratic Leaders in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Feb. 5, 2021, in Washington.

Pentagon will deploy troops to assist COVID-19 vaccine drive

President Joe Biden speaks with House Democratic Leaders in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Feb. 5, 2021, in Washington.

February 5, 2021, 1:12pm Health

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon will deploy troops to assist getting Americans vaccinated against COVID-19, the White House said Friday. Read story

How do I make a COVID-19 vaccination appointment, and what is considered multigenerational housing?

February 5, 2021, 11:30am Health

The demand for the coronavirus vaccine was immense from the day doses were first shipped. Now that vaccinations have been extended to some beyond health care workers and others in the first phase and mass-vaccination sites have opened across the state, the frenzy to secure an appointment has turned desperate. Read story

Employers can require the coronavirus vaccine, many holding off for now

February 5, 2021, 10:30am Business

At Google and Amazon, it’s “strongly encouraged.” At Trader Joe’s, it will earn employees extra pay. At the downtown Seattle law firm Davis Wright Tremaine, it will be a condition of returning to the office. Aegis senior living facilities will require it once vaccines are widely available. Read story

With COVID-19 vaccine in short supply, confusion abounds over second shots

February 5, 2021, 10:30am Health

At 71 years old, Lisa Soli was delighted to snag a coveted COVID-19 vaccine during a clinic last month at Overlake Medical Center in Bellevue. But when the retired educator asked about her second dose, the nurse told her they weren’t scheduling boosters and wished her luck finding one. Read story

A new treatment is being ramped up to help reduce COVID-19 hospitalizations

February 4, 2021, 9:46am Health

ATLANTA — On the last day of November, Bill Collins wakes up in the middle of the night, sweating profusely, his heavy pajamas clinging to his body. He’s disoriented, shivering, unsteady on his feet. His wife considers calling an ambulance. Read story

Clinical lab scientist Selam Bihon processes upper respiratory samples from patients suspected of having COVID-19 at the Stanford Clinical Virology Laboratory on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Palo Alto, Calif. Viruses mutate constantly. To stay ahead of the threat, scientists analyze samples for genetic changes, watching closely for ones that might make the virus more infectious or more deadly.

U.S. rushes to catch up in the race to detect mutant viruses

Clinical lab scientist Selam Bihon processes upper respiratory samples from patients suspected of having COVID-19 at the Stanford Clinical Virology Laboratory on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Palo Alto, Calif. Viruses mutate constantly. To stay ahead of the threat, scientists analyze samples for genetic changes, watching closely for ones that might make the virus more infectious or more deadly.

February 4, 2021, 9:33am Health

NEW YORK — Despite its world-class medical system and its vaunted Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. fell behind in the race to detect dangerous coronavirus mutations. And it’s only now beginning to catch up. Read story

Cardiologists say components in iPhone 12 can disable pacemakers, defibrillators

February 4, 2021, 9:31am Health

Magnets and other components inside iPhone 12 devices could disable pacemakers or implanted cardiac defibrillators, tech giant Apple has warned, potentially putting millions of people at risk for dangerous heart complications. Read story