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Breakthrough COVID-19 cases are rising, and experts are trying to figure out exactly what that means

August 30, 2021, 8:15am Health

PITTSBURGH — U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle awoke at 4 a.m. Wednesday at his Washington, D.C., apartment with fever and chills, fearing the worst. Read story

Singing praises of music’s effect on brain

August 30, 2021, 6:00am Health

Music soothes, energizes and inspires. It also fortifies pathways in your brain that neurologists say can lead to a better understanding of cognition and dementia. Read story

Cascade Bicycle Club ride leader Mary Hoshizaki speaks Aug. 18 to a group of cyclists before they head out for a ride in Redmond.

Northwest cyclists strive to make sport accessible

Cascade Bicycle Club ride leader Mary Hoshizaki speaks Aug. 18 to a group of cyclists before they head out for a ride in Redmond.

August 29, 2021, 6:05am Health

SEATTLE — Unsolicited advice. Random male cyclists shouting, “You go girl!” — to middle-aged women. Accusations that they’re showing off from male cyclists they pass on the road who don’t respond well to “getting chicked.” Equipment that isn’t designed with their bodies in mind. Read story

Scientists are racing to unravel the pandemic’s toll on kids’ brains

August 29, 2021, 6:00am Health

Gabriel was always an “angsty” child, his mother, Camille, remembers. Read story

A health worker takes a swab sample from a man to test for the COVID-19 coronavirus at a hospital in Wuhan, China's central Hubei province on February 7, 2021.

Long COVID’s daunting toll seen in study of pandemic’s earliest patients

A health worker takes a swab sample from a man to test for the COVID-19 coronavirus at a hospital in Wuhan, China's central Hubei province on February 7, 2021.

August 29, 2021, 6:00am Health

COVID-19 patients in Wuhan were among the pandemic’s first victims, and a comprehensive new study finds that a year after shaking the coronavirus, survivors were more likely than their uninfected peers to suffer from mobility problems, pain or discomfort, anxiety and depression. Read story

Salt Lake County Health Department public health nurse Lee Cherie Booth points May 11, 2020, to a board showing a hypothetical case that serves as a training tool to teach new contact tracers how to track all the people they need to reach out to after a person tests positive for the new coronavirus.

Contact tracing takes a back seat

Salt Lake County Health Department public health nurse Lee Cherie Booth points May 11, 2020, to a board showing a hypothetical case that serves as a training tool to teach new contact tracers how to track all the people they need to reach out to after a person tests positive for the new coronavirus.

August 28, 2021, 2:04pm Health

Health investigators across the U.S. are finding it nearly impossible to keep up with the deluge of new COVID-19 infections and carry out contact-tracing efforts that were once seen as a pillar of the nation’s pandemic response. Read story

FILE - In this March 21, 2021, file photo, students sit separated by plastic dividers during lunch at Wyandotte County High School in Kansas City, Kan., on the first day of in-person learning. Education officials overseeing more than $1.1 billion in federal pandemic aid for Kansas schools say districts are spending much of the money to meet the mental health needs of students and staff.

Debate over masks now in courtrooms

FILE - In this March 21, 2021, file photo, students sit separated by plastic dividers during lunch at Wyandotte County High School in Kansas City, Kan., on the first day of in-person learning. Education officials overseeing more than $1.1 billion in federal pandemic aid for Kansas schools say districts are spending much of the money to meet the mental health needs of students and staff.

August 28, 2021, 1:58pm Health

WASHINGTON — The debate over whether returning students should wear masks in the classroom has moved from school boards to courtrooms. Read story

Jodie Ford, an ICU nurse, moves electrical cords for medical machines, outside the room of a patient suffering from COVID-19, in an intensive care unit at the Willis-Knighton Medical Center in Shreveport, La., Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2021.

EXPLAINER: What happens when an ICU reaches capacity?

Jodie Ford, an ICU nurse, moves electrical cords for medical machines, outside the room of a patient suffering from COVID-19, in an intensive care unit at the Willis-Knighton Medical Center in Shreveport, La., Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2021.

August 27, 2021, 11:43am Health

ATLANTA — The latest surge in coronavirus cases is overwhelming many intensive care units, causing hospitals and states to run out of ICU beds in some locations. Read story

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2021, file photo, Cher Situm, principal at Morley Nelson Elementary in Boise, Idaho, gives 5th grade student Anthony Nguyen, 10, a hug as he gets ready to join his friends in class on the first day back to school in the Boise School District.  Volunteers are helping with contract tracing at the Central District Health department, and health education classrooms are being converted into COVID-19 treatment units at one northern Idaho hospital. On Thursday, Aug. 26, 2021, some Idaho hospitals only narrowly avoided enacting "crisis standards of care," where scarce healthcare resources are allotted to the patients most likely to benefit, thanks in part to statewide coordination.

COVID-19 forces Idaho hospitals past capacity, toward crisis

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2021, file photo, Cher Situm, principal at Morley Nelson Elementary in Boise, Idaho, gives 5th grade student Anthony Nguyen, 10, a hug as he gets ready to join his friends in class on the first day back to school in the Boise School District.  Volunteers are helping with contract tracing at the Central District Health department, and health education classrooms are being converted into COVID-19 treatment units at one northern Idaho hospital. On Thursday, Aug. 26, 2021, some Idaho hospitals only narrowly avoided enacting "crisis standards of care," where scarce healthcare resources are allotted to the patients most likely to benefit, thanks in part to statewide coordination.

August 27, 2021, 7:52am Health

BOISE, Idaho — Hospital facilities and public health agencies are scrambling to add capacity as the number of coronavirus cases continue to rise statewide. But many Idaho residents don’t seem to feel the same urgency. Read story

Isaac Slabaugh and Fannie Stutzman are surrounded by smoke from the Richard Spring Fire as it moves toward Ashland, Mont., Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021. The fire burning on and around the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation has grown into Montana's largest blaze so far in 2021.

Wildfire smoke exposure linked to preterm births, study says

Isaac Slabaugh and Fannie Stutzman are surrounded by smoke from the Richard Spring Fire as it moves toward Ashland, Mont., Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021. The fire burning on and around the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation has grown into Montana's largest blaze so far in 2021.

August 27, 2021, 7:30am Health

Exposure to wildfire smoke could be contributing to preterm births, according to a new study that evaluated wildfire smoke patterns and records of more than 3 million births in California. Read story