Tuesday, March 2, 2021
March 2, 2021

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The Marysville Care Center on Grove Street in Marysville.

Marysville nursing home, with history of short staffing, cited for ‘squalid’ conditions in COVID-19 outbreak

The Marysville Care Center on Grove Street in Marysville.

February 9, 2021, 2:45pm Health

Months before she died, Lourdes Yldefonzo Arganda assured her sister she would be safe in her job at a Marysville nursing home. Read story

Can a fourth wave of COVID-19 be prevented? Not likely, says Fred Hutch model — but the curve could be flattened

February 9, 2021, 10:35am Health

The outlook seemed almost rosy when Dr. Joshua Schiffer and his colleagues set out to determine how factors like vaccination rate, vaccine effectiveness and social distancing might combine to bring the novel coronavirus pandemic under control. Read story

Marion Koopmans, right, and Peter Ben Embarek, center, of the World Health Organization team say farewell to their Chinese counterpart Liang Wannian, left, after a WHO-China Joint Study Press Conference held at the end of the WHO mission in Wuhan, China, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021.

WHO team: Coronavirus unlikely to have leaked from China lab

Marion Koopmans, right, and Peter Ben Embarek, center, of the World Health Organization team say farewell to their Chinese counterpart Liang Wannian, left, after a WHO-China Joint Study Press Conference held at the end of the WHO mission in Wuhan, China, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021.

February 9, 2021, 8:01am Health

WUHAN, China — The coronavirus most likely first appeared in humans after jumping from an animal, a team of international and Chinese scientists looking for the origins of COVID-19 said Tuesday, dismissing as unlikely an alternate theory that the virus leaked from a Chinese lab. Read story

Vaccinations expected to ramp up

February 9, 2021, 6:00am Health

President Joe Biden says the U.S. soon will be able to vaccinate 1.5 million people daily for COVID-19, and he expects any person who wants to be vaccinated will be able to do so by the spring. Read story

Drinking at least seven cups of green tea or one cup of coffee daily can lower the risk of death in those who've had a heart attack or stroke, according to researchers in Japan.

After heart attack, stroke, green tea, coffee helpful

Drinking at least seven cups of green tea or one cup of coffee daily can lower the risk of death in those who've had a heart attack or stroke, according to researchers in Japan.

February 9, 2021, 6:00am Health

Drinking large amounts of green tea or a single cup of coffee each day may reduce the risk of death for people who survive heart attacks and strokes, new research shows. Read story

Can COVID-19 vaccines be mixed? No

February 9, 2021, 6:00am Health

Can COVID-19 vaccines be mixed and matched? Read story

Projected pandemic baby boom a bust

February 9, 2021, 6:00am Health

Early in the pandemic, some speculated that couples isolated together during lockdowns might produce a year-end baby boom. The opposite occurred. Read story

What’s the catch with seafood?

February 9, 2021, 6:00am Health

Even before we are born, we need key nutrients found in fish and seafood. That’s according to the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020-2025, which advises pregnant women to consume 8 to 12 ounces of a variety of seafood each week. Besides being an excellent source of baby-building protein, seafood… Read story

This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19. According to research released in 2021, evidence is mounting that having COVID-19 may not protect against getting infected again with some of the new variants. People also can get second infections with earlier versions of the coronavirus if they mounted a weak defense the first time. (Hannah A.

New variants raise worry about COVID-19 virus reinfections

This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which cause COVID-19. According to research released in 2021, evidence is mounting that having COVID-19 may not protect against getting infected again with some of the new variants. People also can get second infections with earlier versions of the coronavirus if they mounted a weak defense the first time. (Hannah A.

February 8, 2021, 12:40pm Health

Evidence is mounting that having COVID-19 may not protect against getting infected again with some of the new variants. People also can get second infections with earlier versions of the coronavirus if they mounted a weak defense the first time, new research suggests. Read story

People enter a socially distanced line to get their COVID-19 vaccinations at Gillette Stadium, Monday, Feb. 8, 2021, in Foxborough, Mass.

Vaccine drive gains speed, but maskless fans fuel worries

People enter a socially distanced line to get their COVID-19 vaccinations at Gillette Stadium, Monday, Feb. 8, 2021, in Foxborough, Mass.

February 8, 2021, 11:46am Health

The drive to vaccinate Americans against the coronavirus is gaining speed and newly recorded cases have fallen to their lowest level in three months, but authorities worry that raucous Super Bowl celebrations could fuel new outbreaks. Read story