Monday, May 17, 2021
May 17, 2021

Linkedin Pinterest
Healthright chevron arrow icon

Health Wire

Doctors baffled by brain disorder

April 27, 2021, 5:41am Health

A “cluster” of patients experiencing hallucinations and memory loss has doctors in northeast Canada concerned that they’re seeing a new kind of brain disease. Read story

Priscilla Medina poses for a portrait in her home in Queens in New York on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. After being exposed and suffering severe symptoms from COVID-19, If Medina had gotten COVID-19 a year earlier, she would have had no treatments proven safe and effective to try. But when the 30-year-old nurse arrived at a Long Island hospital in March 2021, so short of breath she could barely talk, doctors knew just what to do. They quickly arranged for her to get a novel drug that supplies virus-blocking antibodies, and "by the next day I was able to get up and move around," she said. After two days, "I really started turning the corner.

COVID treatment has improved, but many wish for an easy pill

Priscilla Medina poses for a portrait in her home in Queens in New York on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. After being exposed and suffering severe symptoms from COVID-19, If Medina had gotten COVID-19 a year earlier, she would have had no treatments proven safe and effective to try. But when the 30-year-old nurse arrived at a Long Island hospital in March 2021, so short of breath she could barely talk, doctors knew just what to do. They quickly arranged for her to get a novel drug that supplies virus-blocking antibodies, and "by the next day I was able to get up and move around," she said. After two days, "I really started turning the corner.

April 26, 2021, 8:29am Health

If Priscila Medina had gotten COVID-19 a year ago, she would have had no treatments proven safe and effective to try. But when the 30-year-old nurse arrived at a Long Island hospital last month, so short of breath she could barely talk, doctors knew just what to do. Read story

FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2020, file photo, a woman walks into the international airport in Honolulu amid a quarantine rule that effectively shut down the tourism industry in the state. Hawaii officials announced Tuesday, April 20, 2021, that they are moving forward with a plan to allow state residents who have been fully vaccinated to skip pre-travel coronavirus testing and quarantine requirements for flights between the islands.

What are COVID vaccination passports and should they be used?

FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2020, file photo, a woman walks into the international airport in Honolulu amid a quarantine rule that effectively shut down the tourism industry in the state. Hawaii officials announced Tuesday, April 20, 2021, that they are moving forward with a plan to allow state residents who have been fully vaccinated to skip pre-travel coronavirus testing and quarantine requirements for flights between the islands.

April 26, 2021, 6:00am Health

An idea garnering attention but not traction is COVID-19 vaccination passports. Read story

The Bascom OB-GYN urgent care clinic, which opened last year at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in San Jose, California, was a decade-long dream of Drs. Anita Sit (left) and Cheryl Pan. They say the clinic has treated 1,300 women suffering common but potentially deadly problems, from bladder infections to ectopic pregnancies, sparing them hours of waiting in ERs.

Pandemic highlights need for urgent care clinics for women

The Bascom OB-GYN urgent care clinic, which opened last year at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in San Jose, California, was a decade-long dream of Drs. Anita Sit (left) and Cheryl Pan. They say the clinic has treated 1,300 women suffering common but potentially deadly problems, from bladder infections to ectopic pregnancies, sparing them hours of waiting in ERs.

April 25, 2021, 4:30pm Health

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Last spring, only weeks into the pandemic, Christina Garcia was spending her days struggling to help her two young sons adjust to online schooling when she got such a heavy, painful period she could barely stand. After a few days, her vision began to blur and… Read story

FILE - This Dec. 10, 2020 file photo shows Food and Drug Administration building in Silver Spring, Md.  Each year the U.S. approves dozens of new uses for cancer drugs based on early signs that they can shrink or slow the spread of tumors. But how often do patients actually live longer, more active lives? That seemingly simple question is, in fact, one of the thorniest debates in medicine.

FDA to scrutinize unproven cancer drugs after 10-year gap

FILE - This Dec. 10, 2020 file photo shows Food and Drug Administration building in Silver Spring, Md.  Each year the U.S. approves dozens of new uses for cancer drugs based on early signs that they can shrink or slow the spread of tumors. But how often do patients actually live longer, more active lives? That seemingly simple question is, in fact, one of the thorniest debates in medicine.

April 25, 2021, 12:36pm Health

WASHINGTON — Each year the U.S. approves dozens of new uses for cancer drugs based on early signs that they can shrink or slow the spread of tumors. Read story

Erica Gaertner, administrator at McKay Healthcare & Rehab in Soap Lake, Wash. on Friday.  In November, a COVID-19 outbreak at the Soap Lake long-term care facility sickened 31 people and many of its staff, including Erica. The facility lost 15 residents to COVID-19. The photo was taken on Friday, Dec. 11, 2020.

Why some health care workers were reluctant to get COVID shots

Erica Gaertner, administrator at McKay Healthcare & Rehab in Soap Lake, Wash. on Friday.  In November, a COVID-19 outbreak at the Soap Lake long-term care facility sickened 31 people and many of its staff, including Erica. The facility lost 15 residents to COVID-19. The photo was taken on Friday, Dec. 11, 2020.

April 25, 2021, 10:30am Health

SEATTLE — After a horrific onslaught of COVID-19 killed the majority of residents at a small nursing home in Grant County, Washington, facility director Erica Gaertner couldn’t wait to roll up her sleeve when the first vaccines rolled out. Read story

FILE - In this March 3, 2021, file photo, U.S. Army medic Kristen Rogers, of Waxhaw, N.C., holds a vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in North Miami, Fla. With the U.S. pause of the vaccine, authorities are weighing whether to resume the shots the way European regulators decided to -- with warnings of a "very rare" risk. New guidance is expected late Friday, April 23, after a government advisory panel deliberates a link between the shot and a handful of vaccine recipients who developed highly unusual blood clots.

U.S. health panel urges restarting J&J COVID-19 vaccinations

FILE - In this March 3, 2021, file photo, U.S. Army medic Kristen Rogers, of Waxhaw, N.C., holds a vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in North Miami, Fla. With the U.S. pause of the vaccine, authorities are weighing whether to resume the shots the way European regulators decided to -- with warnings of a "very rare" risk. New guidance is expected late Friday, April 23, after a government advisory panel deliberates a link between the shot and a handful of vaccine recipients who developed highly unusual blood clots.

April 23, 2021, 2:32pm Business

U.S. health advisers on Friday urged resuming COVID-19 vaccinations with Johnson & Johnson's single-dose shot, saying its benefits outweigh a rare risk of blood clots — in line with Europe's rollout. Read story

FILE - In this March 19, 2021, file photo, nurses fill syringes with a COVID-19 vaccine at a mass vaccination site in Kansas City, Mo. Demand for the coronavirus vaccine has fallen off in some places around the United States to the point where some counties are turning down new shipments of doses.

U.S. drop in vaccine demand has some places turning down doses

FILE - In this March 19, 2021, file photo, nurses fill syringes with a COVID-19 vaccine at a mass vaccination site in Kansas City, Mo. Demand for the coronavirus vaccine has fallen off in some places around the United States to the point where some counties are turning down new shipments of doses.

April 23, 2021, 8:53am Health

JACKSON, Miss. — Louisiana has stopped asking the federal government for its full allotment of COVID-19 vaccine. About three-quarters of Kansas counties have turned down new shipments of the vaccine at least once over the past month. And in Mississippi, officials asked the federal government to ship vials in smaller… Read story

FILE - In this Friday, May 8, 2020 file photo, a respiratory therapist pulls on a second mask over her N95 mask before adding a face shield as she gets ready to go into a patient's room in the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at a hospital in Seattle.  Medical providers may soon return to using one medical N95 mask per patient, a practice that was suspended during the pandemic due to deadly supply shortages.

FDA: N95 masks, now plentiful, should no longer be reused

FILE - In this Friday, May 8, 2020 file photo, a respiratory therapist pulls on a second mask over her N95 mask before adding a face shield as she gets ready to go into a patient's room in the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at a hospital in Seattle.  Medical providers may soon return to using one medical N95 mask per patient, a practice that was suspended during the pandemic due to deadly supply shortages.

April 23, 2021, 8:26am Health

The Biden administration has taken the first step toward ending an emergency exception that allowed hospitals to ration and reuse N95 medical masks, the first line of defense between frontline workers and the deadly coronavirus. Read story

FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2021, file photo, a senior receives a COVID-19 vaccine from a healthcare worker after arriving on a bus to a vaccination site at Anquan Boldin Stadium in Pahokee, Fla. COVID-19 hospitalizations are plunging among older Americans. The falling numbers show the country’s vaccination strategy is working, pushing deaths lower and easing pressure on the frayed hospital system.

COVID-19 hospitalizations tumble among US senior citizens

FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2021, file photo, a senior receives a COVID-19 vaccine from a healthcare worker after arriving on a bus to a vaccination site at Anquan Boldin Stadium in Pahokee, Fla. COVID-19 hospitalizations are plunging among older Americans. The falling numbers show the country’s vaccination strategy is working, pushing deaths lower and easing pressure on the frayed hospital system.

April 22, 2021, 11:58am Health

WASHINGTON (AP) — COVID-19 hospitalizations among older Americans have plunged 80% since the start of the year, dramatic proof the vaccination campaign is working. Now the trick is to get more of the nation's younger people to roll up their sleeves. Read story