Monday, June 27, 2022
June 27, 2022

Linkedin Pinterest

Politics

Clark County PoliticsElection
The U.S. Supreme Court, Tuesday, June 21, 2022 in Washington.

Supreme Court limits reach of federal gun crime law

The U.S. Supreme Court, Tuesday, June 21, 2022 in Washington.

June 21, 2022, 12:04pm Politics

The Supreme Court on Tuesday limited the reach of a federal statute that requires stiff penalties for crimes involving a gun. Read story

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson speaks March 23, 2022, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Months into a complex trial over their role in flooding Washington with highly addictive painkillers, the nation's three largest opioid distributors have agreed to pay the state $518 million. Ferguson announced the deal Tuesday, May 3, 2022. (AP Photo/Ted S.

Ferguson: Supreme Court decision won’t hurt Hanford workers

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson speaks March 23, 2022, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Months into a complex trial over their role in flooding Washington with highly addictive painkillers, the nation's three largest opioid distributors have agreed to pay the state $518 million. Ferguson announced the deal Tuesday, May 3, 2022. (AP Photo/Ted S.

June 21, 2022, 10:48am Latest News

While the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled against a 2018 state law that protected workers at a former nuclear weapons production site, Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson said an updated law passed earlier this year remains in place. Read story

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, June 15, 2022, in Washington.

High court rules religious schools can get Maine tuition aid

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, June 15, 2022, in Washington.

June 21, 2022, 8:27am Latest News

The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that religious schools can’t be excluded from a Maine program that offers tuition aid for private education, a decision that could ease religious organizations’ access to taxpayer money. Read story

FILE - An international sign warning about mines hangs beside a minefield at Bagram Air Base on, March 22, 2002. The White House announced Tuesday a new policy curtailing the use of anti-personnel land mines by the U.S. military, reversing a more permissive stance that was enacted by former President Donald Trump. Under the policy, such explosives will still be allowed to defend South Korea against a potential attack by North Korea, but otherwise they will be banned.

Most land mine use by U.S. military banned, except for Korea

FILE - An international sign warning about mines hangs beside a minefield at Bagram Air Base on, March 22, 2002. The White House announced Tuesday a new policy curtailing the use of anti-personnel land mines by the U.S. military, reversing a more permissive stance that was enacted by former President Donald Trump. Under the policy, such explosives will still be allowed to defend South Korea against a potential attack by North Korea, but otherwise they will be banned.

June 21, 2022, 8:27am Politics

President Joe Biden’s administration announced Tuesday that it would restrict the use of anti-personnel land mines by the U.S. military, aligning the country’s policy more closely with an international treaty banning the deadly explosives. Read story

FILE - Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., talks with the media after voting in Alabama's state primary in Huntsville, Ala., May 24, 2022. Brooks is seeking the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate.

Election 2022: Trump endorsement flip scrambles Alabama race

FILE - Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., talks with the media after voting in Alabama's state primary in Huntsville, Ala., May 24, 2022. Brooks is seeking the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate.

June 21, 2022, 8:26am Politics

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks has run his race for Senate on former President Donald Trump’s election lies, refusing to accept the outcome of the 2020 contest. He’s campaigned alongside the organizers of the Jan. 6 rally that preceded the storming of the Capitol building — the rally where he infamously… Read story

FILE - President Joe Biden greets firefighters as he tours the National Interagency Fire Center, Sept. 13, 2021, in Boise, Idaho. Biden on June 21, 2022, signed off on giving federal wildland firefighters a hefty raise for the next two fiscal years, a move that comes as much of the West is bracing for a difficult wildfire season.

Biden signs off on hefty pay raise for federal firefighters

FILE - President Joe Biden greets firefighters as he tours the National Interagency Fire Center, Sept. 13, 2021, in Boise, Idaho. Biden on June 21, 2022, signed off on giving federal wildland firefighters a hefty raise for the next two fiscal years, a move that comes as much of the West is bracing for a difficult wildfire season.

June 21, 2022, 8:25am Nation & World

President Joe Biden has signed off on giving federal wildland firefighters a hefty raise for the next two fiscal years, a move that affects more than 16,000 firefighters and comes as much of the West braces for a difficult wildfire season. Read story

Fumio Kishida, Japanese Prime Minister and president of ruling Liberal Democratic Party attends their debate, ahead of the Upper House election slated for July 10, in Tokyo, Japan, Tuesday, June 21, 2022.

Japan PM says dialogue with China, S. Korea key to stability

Fumio Kishida, Japanese Prime Minister and president of ruling Liberal Democratic Party attends their debate, ahead of the Upper House election slated for July 10, in Tokyo, Japan, Tuesday, June 21, 2022.

June 21, 2022, 8:21am Politics

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said Tuesday that talks with China’s leader are key to regional and international peace and stability amid growing tensions over territorial disputes and Beijing’s increased military activity around Japan. Read story

Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, left, speaks during a joint statement with Foreign Minister Yair Lapid, at the Knesset, Israel's parliament, in Jerusalem, Monday, June 20, 2022. Bennett's office announced Monday, that his weakened coalition will be disbanded and the country will head to new elections. Bennett and his main coalition partner, Yair Lapid, decided to present a vote to dissolve parliament in the coming days, Bennett's office said. Lapid is then to serve as caretaker prime minister. The election, expected in the fall, would be Israel's fifth in three years.

Israeli government fast-tracks bill to dissolve parliament

Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, left, speaks during a joint statement with Foreign Minister Yair Lapid, at the Knesset, Israel's parliament, in Jerusalem, Monday, June 20, 2022. Bennett's office announced Monday, that his weakened coalition will be disbanded and the country will head to new elections. Bennett and his main coalition partner, Yair Lapid, decided to present a vote to dissolve parliament in the coming days, Bennett's office said. Lapid is then to serve as caretaker prime minister. The election, expected in the fall, would be Israel's fifth in three years.

June 21, 2022, 8:19am Nation & World

Israel’s outgoing coalition government will fast-track a bill this week to dissolve parliament, setting up the country for its fifth elections in three years, a Cabinet minister said Tuesday. Read story