Wednesday, October 27, 2021
Oct. 27, 2021

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Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., a key holdout vote on President Joe Biden's domestic agenda, chairs a hearing of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. (AP Photo/J.

Billionaire tax takes shape as Biden pushes for budget deal

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., a key holdout vote on President Joe Biden's domestic agenda, chairs a hearing of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. (AP Photo/J.

October 25, 2021, 1:35pm Latest News

WASHINGTON — Democrats are working frantically to shore up the revenue side of President Joe Biden’s domestic package, poised to unveil a new billionaires’ tax to help pay for his social services and climate change plan after earlier tax plans fizzled. Read story

Hostage families to Biden: ‘Bring our fellow Americans home’

October 25, 2021, 11:58am Politics

WASHINGTON (AP) — Relatives of more than two dozen American hostages and wrongful detainees held overseas told President Joe Biden in a letter on Monday that they questioned his administration's commitment to bringing their loved ones' home. Read story

FILE - In this Oct. 6 2021, file photo Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, accompanied by from left, Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., and Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, Sen. Todd Young, R-Ind., Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, and Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington to speak about immigration at the U.S.- Mexico boarder. About 36% of President Joe Biden's nominees have been confirmed by the Senate so far in the evenly divided Senate, a deterioration from the paltry 38% success rate that former President Donald Trump saw at the same stage of his presidency.

Sluggish pace of confirmations vexes Biden White House

FILE - In this Oct. 6 2021, file photo Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, accompanied by from left, Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., and Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, Sen. Todd Young, R-Ind., Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, and Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington to speak about immigration at the U.S.- Mexico boarder. About 36% of President Joe Biden's nominees have been confirmed by the Senate so far in the evenly divided Senate, a deterioration from the paltry 38% success rate that former President Donald Trump saw at the same stage of his presidency.

October 25, 2021, 8:36am Politics

WASHINGTON — The Senate’s willingness to confirm a president’s nominees took a downward turn during Donald Trump’s first year in office. And it has only gotten worse for President Joe Biden. Read story

Chinese, Taliban representatives to meet in Qatar

October 25, 2021, 8:34am Nation & World

BEIJING — Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi will meet with Taliban representatives during a trip this week to the Persian Gulf nation of Qatar, an official said Monday. Read story

In this summer 2021 photo provided by CBS News, former senior Saudi security official Saad al-Jabri sits for an interview with journalist Scott Pelley in Washington during an interview for "60 Minutes." (CBS News/60 Minutes via AP)

Ex-Saudi official claims damaging intel against crown prince

In this summer 2021 photo provided by CBS News, former senior Saudi security official Saad al-Jabri sits for an interview with journalist Scott Pelley in Washington during an interview for "60 Minutes." (CBS News/60 Minutes via AP)

October 25, 2021, 8:27am Nation & World

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — A former senior Saudi security official who helped oversee joint counter-terrorism efforts with the United States claimed in an interview with “60 Minutes” that the kingdom’s crown prince once spoke of killing a sitting Saudi monarch before his own father was crowned king. Read story

Senior campaigner from SumOfUs Flora Rebello Arduini adjusts an installation outside parliament in Westminster in London, Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. A 4-metre-high installation depicting Mark Zuckerberg surfing on a wave of cash was constructed outside parliament, as Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen is due to testify to MPs on how the company puts profits ahead of public safety. The action comes after SumOfUs research revealed Instagram is still awash with posts promoting eating disorders, unproven diet supplements and skin-whitening products.

Whistleblower Haugen says Facebook making online hate worse

Senior campaigner from SumOfUs Flora Rebello Arduini adjusts an installation outside parliament in Westminster in London, Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. A 4-metre-high installation depicting Mark Zuckerberg surfing on a wave of cash was constructed outside parliament, as Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen is due to testify to MPs on how the company puts profits ahead of public safety. The action comes after SumOfUs research revealed Instagram is still awash with posts promoting eating disorders, unproven diet supplements and skin-whitening products.

October 25, 2021, 8:04am Business

LONDON — Former Facebook data scientist turned whistleblower Frances Haugen on Monday told lawmakers in the United Kingdom working on legislation to rein in social media companies that the company is making online hate and extremism worse and outlined how it could improve online safety. Read story

FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2017, file photo, Nick Brown, then-counsel to Gov. Jay Inslee, takes questions at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Sens. The U.S. Senate has confirmed a pair of firsts to be the Justice Department's top lawyers in Washington state. Brown, the former general counsel to Gov. Jay Inslee, will be the first Black top federal prosecutor in Western Washington, while Vanessa Waldref, an environmental lawyer for the DOJ, will be the first woman to run the U.S. attorney's office in Eastern Washington. (AP Photo/Ted S.

From TV to U.S. attorney: Nick Brown plans ‘different perspective’ on justice in Seattle

FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2017, file photo, Nick Brown, then-counsel to Gov. Jay Inslee, takes questions at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Sens. The U.S. Senate has confirmed a pair of firsts to be the Justice Department's top lawyers in Washington state. Brown, the former general counsel to Gov. Jay Inslee, will be the first Black top federal prosecutor in Western Washington, while Vanessa Waldref, an environmental lawyer for the DOJ, will be the first woman to run the U.S. attorney's office in Eastern Washington. (AP Photo/Ted S.

October 25, 2021, 6:02am Latest News

The Australian outback is unforgiving, but not much more so than the fraught world of partisan politics. Newly appointed U.S. Attorney Nick Brown, a onetime contestant on TV’s “Survivor,” Harvard Law School graduate and U.S. Army defense lawyer, has thrived in both. Read story

FILE - In this Aug. 24, 2020, file photo, Auburn police Officer Jeff Nelson appears in King County Superior Court court in Kent, Wash. Nelson pleaded not guilty to charges in the killing of Jesse Sarey in 2019. Although Nelson has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, he wasn't on the King County prosecuting attorney's "potential impeachment disclosure" list, or Brady List, which flags officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct, until after being charged in Sarey's death. An Associated Press investigation based on hundreds of documents and interviews with prosecutors, defense attorneys and experts on police reform found that prosecutors do not always used the lists to ensure accountability.

Tool for police reform rarely used by local prosecutors

FILE - In this Aug. 24, 2020, file photo, Auburn police Officer Jeff Nelson appears in King County Superior Court court in Kent, Wash. Nelson pleaded not guilty to charges in the killing of Jesse Sarey in 2019. Although Nelson has been investigated in more than 60 use-of-force cases since 2012, he wasn't on the King County prosecuting attorney's "potential impeachment disclosure" list, or Brady List, which flags officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct, until after being charged in Sarey's death. An Associated Press investigation based on hundreds of documents and interviews with prosecutors, defense attorneys and experts on police reform found that prosecutors do not always used the lists to ensure accountability.

October 25, 2021, 6:00am Latest News

SEATTLE — Isaiah Obet was behaving erratically and in mental distress in 2017 when Officer Jeff Nelson ordered his police dog to attack and then shot Obet in the torso. Obet fell to the ground and Nelson fired again, fatally shooting Obet in the head. The officer said his life… Read story